Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy: One Word, Spitzer

Looks like Eliot Spitzer aka the Sheriff of Wall Street may soon become the Birdman of Alcatraz because of the unscrupulous actions of his evil alter ego, Client Number 9. It is mind boggling that an individual could posses such an incredible amount of sanctimonious hubris by proclaiming himself to be the "slayer" of corruption while simultaneous being the "layer" of high priced hookers.

Millions of people watched with amazement as the sordid details began to unfold and a once meteoric political career crashed and burned on national television, on the internet, on the radio and in the papers. While Wall Street celebrated jubilantly and NY Republicans were beside themselves with glee and Hevesi and Bruno enjoyed Champaign toasts, numerous democrats and illegal immigrants were running for the hills seeking sanctuary from the disgrace. Not surprisingly, the favorite son of the Democratic Party quickly transformed into the bastard two headed stepchild in a matter of seconds.


Consequently, it is being reported that Eliot Pimptzer will resign and Lt. Governor Paterson will take over as New York State Executive. It is widely accepted that Patterson is a very capable public servant and has the ability to work with elected officials on both sides of the aisle; however, I think New Yorkers should be given the chance to elect a new administration. Nothing against Lt. Governor Patterson but we should rid Albany of all remnants of the "Spitzer Effect"



Political Perceptions: The Spitzer Effect

by Sara Murray and Gerald F. Seib


Fallout from the Eliot Spitzer prostitution revelation has suddenly crowded out analysis of the presidential campaign. Slate's Christopher Beam ties the two together by raising the question: Will the Spitzer affair hurt Sen. Hillary Clinton? Beam notes that Spitzer endorsed Clinton, but never did all that much for her on the campaign trail. He did, however, cause "perhaps the biggest headache of Clinton's campaign so far: the flap over driver's licenses for illegal immigrants. After waffling during a debate in October on whether she supported the measure, Clinton came out against it. (Spitzer later backed away from the plan, as well.) But the damage was done." Now, Clinton eventually will have to respond at some point to the Spitzer shocker, but doing so "raises the ghosts of scandals past, namely Monica Lewinsky…. If the Spitzer controversy drags out, it could become a painful reminder of the final White House years."

Newsday's Dan Janison points out why it's likely to be harder for Spitzer to ride out the scandal than it has been for other politicians caught in such a bind: "Spitzer's story could have a bit less resonance and invoke a bit more sympathy, maybe, if not for all the sanctimony." He cites the instances in which he cut little slack for other politicians' foibles: "Remember how abruptly he ran from Alan Hevesi when it became clear the Democratic comptroller, his 2006 ticket mate, was misusing state resources to take care of his ailing wife? Remember how he once put down Rudy Giuliani as the city's Girolamo Savonarola, recalling the 15th-century Dominican reformer and moral crusader who was eventually executed?" And so forth.

On the Republican side, Sen. John McCain has his own set of problems to deal with. Liberals loved McCain when he was the anti-establishment candidate years ago. But now that he has been nominated by the GOP, flipped his stance on the Bush tax cuts and renounced his previously liberal persona, they're not so sure about him, writes The Washington Post's E. J. Dionne. "There is an independent side to McCain that has made him an authentic maverick," Dionne writes. "But on so many issues, he is nothing more (or less) than a thoroughly conventional conservative politician." Now it's up to liberals to judge the side of McCain that "is as conservative as he always said he was."

Another McCain setback: that pesky comment on how little he knows about the economy. And while he has stopped admitting that, his extreme candor and lack of anything but the generic GOP plans to cut taxes and curb spending, haven't propelled his image as an economy wonk, writes Politico's Jonathan Martin. McCain will need to define his plans for the economy and campaign with good-news trade stories if he wants a shot at winning the election. "It may not be a natural fit for McCain, who spent much of his 2000 run focused on the broad notion of reform and the early-going of this campaign on Iraq," Martin notes, "But the electorate dictates what matters most to the candidate — not the other way around."

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

>>>Millions of people watched with amazement as the sordid details began to unfold and a once meteoric political career crashed and burned on national television, on the internet, on the radio and in the papers. <<

Yes, it's a pity how far Dennis Gallagher has fallen in such a short time...

Thomas said...

I knew it was just a matter of time before the JPCA, Holden, Nunziatio,Wilkenson and pamperman would try to implicate Gallagher in the Spitzer fiasco. The next Juniper Berry will feature story stating that Gallagher is the head of 3786 seperate prostitution rings and uses the proceeds to sell enriched uranium to the Iranians. Holden will say he has proof, Nunziato will nod his head, Wilkenson will want to preserve the brothel house becuase it was built in 1987, and pamperman will try to locate Iran on a map.

Anonymous said...

Patterson will give his long time homonym, Frank Padavan, a chance for redemption, after Padavan was repeatedly jitled for a commissionership under Pataki and Giuliani. Padavan prides himself as a party-less independent, and has been under increasing threat from his traditional constituents because of his opposition to their dormitory and their feudal zoning casuistry. Given how he was ostensibly denied commissionerships in order to preserve the majority, he relishes this unique opportuntiy at payback.

Anonymous said...

How are liberals hypocrites? He was caught with a prostitute and was asked to resign. Compare that to Senator David Vitter of LA who gets caught in a prostitution ring and gets a friggin standing ovation from Senate Republicans.

Pretty selective moral outrage by conservatives...

Mr. Mojo Risin...